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Instructions, Answers, and Tips for Growing the Moringa Oleifera Tree
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Location: Tennessee, USA
Homepage: http://http: www.moringa4healing.com
Occupation: freelance writer, Master Herblalist
Birthdate: July 12, 1951 (68 years old)
Interests: writing, gardening, herbal medicine, pets, alternative medicine
Biography: Researcher, Published freelance writer and Master Herbalist with over 300 published articles on Yahoo voices since 2010. Received Yahoo honors including Best of 1000 authors in both 2011 and 2012 with over a million page views over the past several years. These articles will be republished here in this article directory over the next several months as yahoo is eliminating their writers platform July 31st.

I am a Master Herbalist, Health Coach and Freelance writer. My husband and I live in beautiful Indian Mound, TN. Moringa and Healing Herbs is also located here now.


Writing has been a passion since childhood. My path into herbal medicine came later in life. Both passions have now blended into my life and work. . It is a honor to be able to share my knowledge and experience with readers here.

One of my projects is to get people to start herb gardens as in the old days of this country. It is important to incorporate medicinal herbs into your herb garden for the sake of you and your family. We have just moved to a house with a few acres to grow on with a creek running through it. An oasis of peace . It will be an exciting year of growth.

Education:
Dominion Herbal College, Canada; Master Herbalist; Studied under Keith Smith, Master Herbalist, under the late Bernard Jensen, and the late Dr. Christopher.

Visit my Growing and Using Moringa and Healing Herbs Bog below
https://herbladyisintoday.blogspot.com/

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Instructions, Answers, and Tips for Growing the Moringa Oleifera Tree
By
Sep 23, 2016 (Edited Sep 24, 2016)

Instructions, Answers, and Tips for Growing the Moringa Oleifera Tree


General Information:

Known as the Drumstick Tree, Horseradish Tree, Ben Aile in French, Murungai and many other names in India, Malunkai; Mulangay; Malunggay in the Phillipines, Murunga in Sri Lanka, and hundreds of other names.

The most common of the many Moringa species is Moringa Oleifera. Most research done in the areas of nutrition, water purification, live stock feed, vegetable dyes, herbal medicine and oil production are based on the Oleifera species. It is also the most plentiful and commercially grown species.


So, when we refer to Moringa in these site pages, we are referring to the Moringa Oleifera species.

Moringa is an ideal plant to grow indoors or in your own backyard. In the Philippines, Honduras, Costa Rica, India, Hawaii, and Florida you will find the trees growing in back yards and in cultivated groves just like groves of orange trees.

Moringa grown in mild climates such as Florida will grow quickly if left un-cropped. It is one of the fastest growing biomasses on the planet when properly nourished. Moringa trees may grow 7' to 9' in one year if left unchecked in a mild climate. A fully mature Moringa tree can grow to 35 feet. Moringa trees that are going to have their leaves harvested are cut several times a year. Trees grown for their pod production are allowed to grow taller.

Moringa needs to be planted in soil that drains well. Sandy loam is good. If you have heavy soil, add peat moss, sand, compost, aged manure. I use one from Home Depot called Amend and it is pretty good to add in.

For those of you that live in the United States, particularly the mild southern and western states, you are in luck and can grow Moringa year round outside.


Growing Moringa in Areas Where it Freezes

Moringa doesn’t like the cold and loses it leaves in the winter. For those of you that have a true winter, where it freezes and snows, we recommend that you plant Moringa in large trash cans on wheels, keeping them outside in the spring and summer and bringing them inside when it gets cold. You can use grow lights in the house as well. The house needs to be kept warm with as much natural sunlight as possible. Without proper sunlight, they will do dormant for the winter.

A heated greenhouse is ideal in most areas. The plant will most often die if it freezes completely but can withstand a mild frost. More often than not, a mild frost does kill the tree. I accidentally left my Moringa seedlings out on a night where it dipped just below 32 degrees. So far only one is showing signs of life with a green shoot appearing out of the base root. Moringa loses its leaves when the average temperature drops below 70 degrees.



Altitude and Humidity Matter:

Moringa Trees grow naturally in countries where the area is close to sea level or under 1000 feet. In the United States, Florida is an example. If you are at high altitudes and live in mountainous areas you will have trouble getting them to grow.

Humidity is another factor and important. The trees love areas like Florida where the humidity is high and it rains every day. Dry climates like Nevada are a problem. If you live in a dry area, then you have to create humidity for the trees in the house by putting containers of water near the tree or spraying them with water. You can use a humidifier in the area as well.


Frost- Freezes Will Kill Your Moringa Tree
Location is priority!


Plant Moringa seedlings where citrus trees would grow with protection from the wind.
Moringa doesn't like the cold and loses it leaves in the winter.

For those of you that have a true winter, where it freezes and snows, we recommend that you plant Moringa in large 20 gal or larger deep pots or trash cans with wheels, keeping them outside in the spring and summer and bringing them inside when it gets cold.

A heated greenhouse is ideal in most areas. The plant will die if it freezes completely but it can withstand a mild frost nonetheless. Moringa loses its leaves when the average temperature drops below 70 degrees.


Trees often grow 10 to15 feet the first year, and may reach a maximum height of 65 feet. The wood is brittle, so the trees should not be planted near houses, where a limb might break off in the wind



Transplanting Your Moringa Seedlings:

Keep in mind that Moringa trees grow a long tap root like a carrot . That tap root grows deep long roots. It has few side roots. So give them lots of depth when digging the hole or picking the container.

Moringa Trees grow rapidly, so don't leave them in small pots for long. Plant them in huge containers that will give the long tap root space. You need a room in the home or on your porch where they get many hours of light. If you do not have an area with enough sunlight, you can provide a grow light. They have to have light.

Moringa needs to be planted in soil that drains well. Sandy loam is good. If you have heavy soil, add peat moss, sand, compost, aged manure. I use one from Home Depot called Amend and it is pretty good to add in.

Loosen the soil by digging out an area that is 2 feet wide and at least two feet deep. If you live in an area like Spring Valley, the soil is full of rocks and clay. You will need to add a lot of Amend to make the soil acceptable to the Moringa Tree or most herbs.

Because of this taproot, the tree is very drought-resistant, once established. I must add here, that keeping their roots wet will kill the tree. They do not survive outside in harsh winter climates....that is the reality.

When the tree is about a foot, cut off the top two inches, wait two weeks, then cut off the top again two inches. That creates a stronger tree by pruning it this way.

When the trees reach a height of 3 to 5 feet, cut the tops off. I know this is hard they are so pretty. By this method you will encourage branching at lower stem positions. This makes the leaves easier to harvest as well. Cutting them off will not hurt or damage the tree but gives you more branches with more leaves to eat.




Fertilizing Your Moringa Trees:

Note: If raising the trees in the house, use a organic fertilizer intended for green house growing. Rabbit and goat manure does not make your house smell inviting.

Spread organic rabbit, goat, composted chicken, or composted steer manure around the base of the tree is early spring to increase the yield of the pods. Rabbit and goat manure will not burn the plants. Diluted duck water is awesome and does not burn either. When I had ducks, I used a pump to transfer the enriched water from the duck kiddy pools to the trees. After several months, they were the healthiest trees in the area. They grew 15 feet in a year with the duck irrigation water.

Adding earth worms to the containers will help nourish the trees. Worm castings, worm tea or fish emulsion is also great for the trees. Kelp is another organic fertilizer to help them grow strong.

Do not use chemical fertilizer and miracle grow on the trees. Your goal should be organic nutrition in the leaves. There are some organic fertilizers with kelp and other nutrients that do not smell up the house.




Raising Moringa Trees in the house

You need a warm room that gets plenty of sunlight or grow lights. Even with a greenhouse, it would need to be heated.

You need potting soil that drains well. Moringa needs to be planted in soil that drains well. Sandy loam is good. If you have heavy soil, add peat moss, sand, compost, aged manure. I use one from Home Depot called Amend and it is pretty good to add in. Don't use Miracle Grow or Miracle Grow with moisture retention properties. They tend to get root rot because the soil does not dry out properly between watering.

You need a huge pot that is long and deep. Moringa develops a long tap root. It needs a pot with depth. I use either a min 20 gal black plastic container or 33 gal trash cans with wheels. Make sure you put drainage holes in the bottom. If you keep it in a 3 to 10 gallon pot after it reaches about two feet, it will stop growing, and fail to thrive.

Go to Amazon and buy a 24 inch durable hard plastic plant saucer for your container. They have a long tap root that needs room to roam downward.

If you live in a dry area like Nevada, put a bowl of water in with the baby trees, mist them with water, or use a humidifier in the area where the trees are.

You need a grow light, strong one in the winter to keep them going.
Use a gravy boaster to take out the water that collects in the bottom of the plant saucer.




Pruning Your Moringa Seedling and Tree

Prune seedlings at 1 foot, pinching off the top 1-2 inches. That will cause the seedling to be stronger, not leggy. Prune the top again 1 to 2 inches when it reaches two or three feet. This does not hurt the tree.

Cut the growing tree back when it gets too tall (5-6 feet) to harvest easily. This will encourage more lower branches, more leaves, more food for your family.



Growing Moringa Trees From Cuttings

Moringa needs to be planted in soil that drains well. Sandy loam is good. If you have heavy soil, add peat moss, sand, compost, aged manure. I use one from Home Depot called Amend and it is pretty good to add in.

Start with a mature tree. Cut a limb from 1 1/2 feet long and 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Dry the cutting in the shade for 3 days. Loosen the soil of an area 2' wide by 2'deep .

Amend the soil with compost and ages manure.

Plant one third of the thicker end of the cutting into the ground. Water the cutting daily until you see green growth buds on the cutting. Water the cutting when the ground is dry. Indoors, water the cutting every 2nd or 3rd day after it takes root.

Do not allow water to collect in tray underneath potted cutting. It is generally held that you get faster growth from cuttings.

You harvest 3 times a year. You harvest the leaves, the flowers, and pods. The leaves can be harvested all year around in warm climates.

Cut the tree back when it gets too tall too harvest easily. It will grow up again quickly and won't hurt the tree to cut it back.



Drying Moringa Leaves

Moringa leaves should be dried quickly under low heat (under 100 degrees). This is to avoid mold and mildew, deterioration of the nutritional quality.

Shade drying takes too long and subjects the leave product to develop mold.


Sun drying destroys the Vitamin C and Vitamin A contained in the leaves. It also subjects it to dust and contamination from the air.

Pick the leaves, wash your leaves, shake out excess moisture, spread lightly on a cookie pan, and turn oven on with less than 100 degrees of heat, for a few hours. Do not heap the leaves on the pan thickly, they will not dry properly. The other method is a dehydrator, again, layering thinly, under very low heat until they are crisp.....



Growing Moringa as a Hedge or in Rows:

Plant the seeds or seedlings one foot apart. Pinch back every other new leaf growth, which forces the tree to grow like a bush. Once they are 2 feet tall, cut the branches in half lengthwise. Pinch back the new leaf growth that spouts out at the top of the tree.

When planting Moringa seedlings in row, space the plants 3 feet apart with 6 feet between rows for easy removal of weeds.



Want to grow Moringa as a commerical venture?

If you have questions concerning growing Moringa as a commercial venture, I am not your expert. I have not grown Moringa on hundreds of acres or as a commercial venture selling the leaves or pods. I do have people contact me regarding these questions, which I am not experienced to answer.

Author:

Published by Kate Freer

We do not sell Moringa products at this point. Our main focus now is education on Moringa and how to buy it safely and know how to determine the quality of the products you purchase.

Copyright: Kate Freer, the Herbladyisin All rights are protected on this article. You do not have permission to use this article or its contents withour my express permission.

http://herbladyisintoday.blogspot.com/ (Growing and Using Moringa and Healing Herbs Blog)

http://herbladyisin.blogspot.com/ (Alternative Medicine in the News Blog)






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